Raleigh Convention Center launches menu featuring products grown by female, BIPOC farmers

The Raleigh Convention Center, along with its in-house caterer Centerplate, have a launched a new menu featuring products grown and raised by local female and BIPOC small-scale farmers.
The Raleigh Convention Center, along with its in-house caterer Centerplate, has launched a new menu featuring products grown and raised by local female and BIPOC small-scale farmers.

RALEIGH, N.C. – The Raleigh Convention Center and its in-house caterer, Centerplate, has introduced a new menu featuring products grown and raised by female and BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) small-scale farmers in North Carolina.

Phil Evans, executive chef at Centerplate, spent a portion of the last year sourcing ingredients from farms across the state, selecting foods that not only enhance the menu, but also help tell the story of historically underrepresented farmers—those who are female and belong to BIPOC communities. It the first time every menu offering features something produced at one of those farms.

As he put the finishing touches on the new menus, Evans spent three weeks personally visiting the farms represented. They include:

Sue Hunter, of Paradox Farms Creamery

“This isn’t simply delicious food—it’s food with a story,” said Kerry Painter, executive director of Raleigh Convention + Performing Arts Complex. “As visitors continue to return to downtown Raleigh, we’re excited to offer a first-class menu that sets us apart from other venues, of course. But we’re especially proud to be able to introduce those visitors to the people behind the flavors. Chef Phil chose products from small, family farms where quality is more important than quantity. The love and care they put into their products come through with every bite.”

“I grew up working in the dirt, gardening with my mother,” Evans said. “The vegetables we grew in our backyard were infinitely more delicious than anything we could have purchased from a large-scale store. And during my time in the restaurant industry, I’ve seen too often how smaller farmers—especially women and BIPOC farmers—are repeatedly overlooked. I’ve met some incredible people across North Carolina who are producing amazing foods. They deserve to be showcased, and our guests deserve to taste the best of the best.”

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